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  • Writer's pictureDevlin Roberts

The Surprising Relationship Between Sleep and Eating: How Healthy Eating Can Improve Your Sleep

Updated: Oct 3, 2022


Do you often feel tired during the day, even though you think you've had enough sleep? You're not alone. According to the National Sleep Foundation, around one-third of American adults report short sleep duration (less than seven hours per night). And that's a problem, because not getting enough sleep can lead to all sorts of health problems, including obesity and diabetes. In this blog post, we'll explore the relationship between eat and sleep, and discuss how healthy eating can improve your sleep.


Why do we crave sleep? The main reason is because our bodies need time to rest and repair. When we're asleep, our body can focus on healing any damage that's been done during the day. Sleep also helps to regulate our hormones, which play a role in everything from appetite to stress levels.

So, what does this have to do with eating? Well, when we're sleep-deprived, our bodies crave energy - and that means sugary, high-calorie foods. This can lead to a vicious circle of overeating and further sleep deprivation. But it may be possible to create a virtuous circle - where healthy eating actually improves your sleep.

For example, research has shown that eat more protein during the day can help you sleep better at night. Protein provides the amino acids needed to produce serotonin, a hormone that helps regulate sleep. Carbohydrates also have a role to play in sleep. Complex carbs (like whole grains) raise levels of tryptophan, another amino acid that promotes sleep.


There are other factors that can affect sleep, including stress and caffeine intake


You're struggling to get enough shut-eye, it's worth considering your diet as well. By making some simple changes to what you eat, you may be able to improve your sleep - and your overall health.

Caffeine is a stimulant, so it's not surprising that it can have an impact on sleep. Caffeine stays in your system for around six hours, so if you're having trouble sleeping, it's best to avoid coffee, tea, and energy drinks after dinner.


If you're struggling to get enough shut-eye, it's worth considering your diet as well. By making some simple changes to what you eat, you may be able to improve your sleep - and your overall health. So next time you're lying awake at night, reach for a glass of warm milk or a piece of fruit instead of that second cup of coffee. Your body (and your mind) will thank you for it!


There are two ways to get the energy we need for all that activity: food and sleep


What's interesting is that, when it comes to energy, they're not opposites - they're actually quite similar. Both food and sleep are essential for our health and well-being, and both have a direct impact on our brain function.


So, if you're looking to boost your brain power, eating healthy foods and getting enough sleep should be at the top of your list!

While most people know that eating right and getting enough sleep are important for their health, they may not realize just how closely the two are related. In fact, the quality of your sleep can have a major impact on your eating habits.


There are a few key nutrients that are known to promote sleep. For example, tryptophan is an amino acid that's found in many high-protein foods, like turkey and salmon. Tryptophan is converted into serotonin, a hormone that helps regulate sleep.

Complex carbohydrates also have a role to play in sleep. Foods like whole grains, sweet potatoes and oats contain high levels of glycogen. Glycogen is broken down during the night and releases glucose - which has been shown to improve sleep quality.

So, if you're looking to eat for better sleep, focus on foods that are high in tryptophan and complex carbohydrates. And make sure to get enough protein during the day - it'll help you sleep better at night!

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